September 2015 Luncheon

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Ethical Decision-Making for PR…and for Life

Presented by: Samra Bufkins, APR, Public Relations Lecturer for the Mayborn School of Journalism at the University of North Texas
Sponsored by: Fort Worth Chamber of Commerce

FWC 2008 LogoAnybody can memorize a code of ethics, but do you really know how to make ethical decisions? Join the Greater Fort Worth PRSA on Wednesday, September 16, as Samra Bufkins, APR, presents an interactive program that will walk you through a solid framework for making sure the business decisions you make will be ethical, regardless of what code of ethics you follow.

Click here to register!
Thank you to the Fort Worth Chamber of Commerce for graciously sponsoring this month’s GFW PRSA luncheon!

Samra Bufkins - photo (1)About Samra Bufkins, APR
Samra “Sam” Bufkins, APR, has more than 25 years of strategic communications experience in the healthcare, environmental, energy, petrochemical, shipping and electricity industries, encompassing public relations, crisis communications, issues management, fundraising, internal communications and governmental relations. She has worked for agencies, nonprofits, a state agency and Fortune 500 companies, and she is accredited by the Public Relations Society of America.

Bufkins is now a lecturer in strategic communications for the Mayborn School of Journalism at the University of North Texas, where she teaches the capstone course in ethics required of all PR and advertising majors and the capstone public relations strategic planning course. She also supervises PR internships. Bufkins enthusiastically incorporates social media strategies and applications into her classes, and also developed (and still teaches) the first strategic social media class at UNT, bringing in nationally known speakers and technical experts. Her teaching philosophy involves combining theory with practice while mentoring and coaching students as if they were junior employees of her PR firm or corporate communications department. She is a member of Kappa Tau Alpha, and is the faculty advisor to the UNT chapter of the Public Relations Student Society of America and the Alpha Tau Omega Fraternity. She is social media advisor to the NT Daily and Swoop, the student-run advertising and public relations agency. She was the recipient of the 2014 Honor Professor award, a student-nominated award presented by the Student Government Association to faculty recognized for exceptional service to students.

Bufkins also served as Accreditation Chair for the Dallas PRSA chapter from 2007-2010 and as Ethics Chair for the Dallas chapter from 2010-2014. She holds a bachelor’s degree in television production, journalism and English from the University of Kentucky, and a master’s degree in public relations/marketing from the University of North Texas. She has been accredited in public relations since 1996.

 

 

The Fourth annual Worthy Awards – Entry Tips and Information

The Fourth annual Worthy Awards
Entry Tips and Information
By: Carolyn Bobo, APR, Fellow PRSA

The Worthy Awards are designed to provide area communications, marketing and public relations professionals with an opportunity to celebrate creativity, strategic thinking and professional ability.

Don’t be hesitant about entering. Think about your activities between January 1, 2014 and June 30, 2015, and go for it.

Here are some tips for preparing your entry.

A solid entry will address these points:

  • What was done?
  • Why did it matter?
  • How was it measured?

Carefully Read the Entry Parameters
The judges (Cleveland’s PRSA chapter) will look at each required area and base their scoring on how well the four entry areas are explained. Entrants should address each required point, and thoughtfully explain their good work so that it is excruciatingly clear to judges not familiar with our area.

Rationale (Tactics) and Research (Campaigns, Projects)
Explain any type of research, and why it was used. A textbook campaign would include formal, original research, but that isn’t always feasible or necessary. Judges know this, so entrants should clearly describe what was done. For example, a brainstorming session, a review of media clips or discussions with clients may be described as secondary, qualitative research … literature review … content analysis … anecdotal reports.

Objective/Purpose (Tactics) and Planning (Campaigns, Projects)
Why did you do what you did? Possible reasons are to increase sales, raise funds, create name recognition or influence public behavior. Describe any factors about the project/tactic that will help judges understand the purpose and the market. Note that the purpose must – absolutely must – match the outcome. Read on to the Evaluation section.

Execution (Campaigns, Projects)
Explain which tactics were chosen and why. When there are several tactical options, the entrant should state, for example, that “these tactics were selected to expand the reach of our message,” identify and justify each tactic.

Remember that the judges won’t know that your decisions and efforts were special unless you tell them.

If your entry states “TV station XYZ sponsored the event,” you must explain that “TV station XYZ rarely supports activities in Fort Worth.” Or, “TV station XYZ sponsors only three events per year, and we convinced the station to choose ours.”

Another hypothetical example: If your target market/public prefers electronic media over print, your entry should state, “Secondary research found that our target demographic prefers to receive electronic communications.” Such data may be obvious to you, but your entry narrative also must make your decision obvious to the judges.

Execution (Tactics)
Here’s where to explain who wrote the copy, designed a magazine, edited content, provided photos, approved the budget and negotiated with a vendor. The tactics section of The Worthy Awards is an explanation of who did what. If an unusual price or component was negotiated, say so, so the judges will understand your extra effort.

Results (Tactics)
Tactics are created to meet a specific need, and are skillfully and professionally prepared. An evaluation of effectiveness and impact, based upon defined objectives, can be simply stated. However, the results must – absolutely must – match the purpose. If the purpose was “to generate five media stories,” the result must show five (or more) media reports. If the purpose is “to raise awareness,” the results must show a measurable increase in awareness.

Evaluation (Campaigns, Projects)
Explain how the targeted market, public or audience responded and how you learned about its response. This is the time to include quantitative data and analysis. Such measures may be a replication of preliminary research or measures of other activities. For example, measures can be election results, a sales increase, ROI, donor or donation increase, or the number of participants/responses that exceeded expectations. Include as much measurable and anecdotal response as possible, and describe future plans.

If comprehensive research was not needed, say so. For example, “More than 5,000 people in our target public responded to the activity. We expected only 3,000, so we did not repeat our preliminary research to measure interest in the topic. However, we will analyze the experience of these respondents to plan future campaigns related to this issue.”

Information below on Communicator of the Year will be available soon. Please check back.

Good luck to everyone. See you at the Nov. 5 awards presentation.

Please feel free to contact us if you have questions or would like more information:

August 2015 Luncheon

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***The Greater Fort Worth PRSA August luncheon is SOLD OUT.***

Creating A Fully Engaged Workforce That Will Result In Powerful Brand Reputation And Customer Satisfaction

Presented by: Katie Coldwell, Southwest Airlines
Sponsored by: Curry Printing

Join the GreaCurry Printingter Fort Worth PRSA on Wednesday, August 12, as Katie Coldwell, director of communication & outreach for Southwest Airlines Co, discusses how to create a fully engaged workforce that results in powerful brand reputation and customer satisfaction.

Southwest Airlines is known for its fun and “LUVing” Corporate Culture. A fully engaged workforce is an essential ingredient for a positive reputation, and bottom-line results, while culture is one of the most powerful elements that can impede or enable change. This session will provide you with a glimpse into how Southwest Airlines uses a variety of communication tools to shape its culture, motivate change, and engage employees, including:

  • Exciting new ideas to energize your employees—all on a minimal budget
  • Opportunities to communicate to your entire employee group—whether you have a highly mobile workforce or one with daily computer access
  • How “Vision” and “Purpose” can’t just be words on paper, but can come to life through storytelling

Click here to register!
Thank you to Curry Printing for graciously sponsoring this month’s GFW PRSA luncheon! 

About Katie Coldwell 

Katie Coldwell has LUVed her job at Southwest Airlines for more than 15 years. An integral member of Southwest’s Communications Team, Katie leads Southwest’s corporate communication function, creating Southwest’s corporate voice, educating and inspiring employees, and fostering an outstanding reputation as a winning global company. Katie also works with the editorial communication team on message and channel strategy for all internal, external and online communications for employees and customers.

Katie graduated with a Marketing and International Business degree from Abilene Christian University. After graduating, she “landed” at Southwest Airlines where the company’s attributes of having a Warrior Spirit, a Servant’s Heart, and a Fun-LUVing Attitude align with Katie’s values. Katie first served Southwest Airlines in the Revenue Management and Pricing Department, then transferred to Communications four years later.

She loves to travel, so it’s a good thing that she works for an airline! On her adventures, she’s visited six continents and 36 countries. When she’s not living out of a suitcase, Katie lives in Farmers Branch, Texas.

June PRSA Meeting

IMPRESS FOR SUCCESS: THE IMPORTANCE OF IMAGE IN THE WORKPLACE

Join the Greater Fort Worth PRSA on Wednesday, June 10, as Leah Frazier, owner of Diamond Icon Image & Styling Consultants and editor of DFW Style Daily, discusses the importance of image in the workplace, including how to edit and tailor your image to impress for success, ensure a lasting impression, and make YOUR professional image work for YOU!  To register, click here.

The cost is:

$25 for members
$35 for non-members
$20 for students

Program highlights include:

  • Identifying the key components of a successful image and the most common problem areas;
  • Maintaining current style through hair, makeup, and clothing;
  • Creating your own personal style through color, body shape, and wardrobe;
  • Improving your appearance, professional demeanor, communication skills and style; and,
  • Achieving your personal goals by taking your professional image to the next level.

ABOUT LEAH FRAZIER

prsa finalBorn and raised in Dallas, Leah Frazier is a multi-licensed attorney, journalist, certified personal shopper, fashion industry consultant, editor of DFW Style Daily, and founder/CEO of Diamond Icon Image & Styling Consultants, one of the top image consulting agencies in Texas. Leah’s expertise has been profiled in an array of top-tier media outlets, including Vogue, The Oxford Press, CBS News, FOX News, Chase TV, Examiner.com, and more.

As editor of DFW Style Daily, Leah has taken her industry acumen and keen eye for fashion to a new level, leading an elite team for the innovative online magazine, bringing readers the very best in fashion and style trends, and cultivating top-tier brand partnerships with Saks Fifth Avenue, Galleria Dallas, the Dallas Vintage Clothing & Jewelry Show, Belk, Mockingbird Station, Aftershock London, Lafayette 148 New York, and Neiman Marcus.

As founder and CEO of Diamond Icon Image & Styling Consultants, Leah has been named by several fashion industry insiders and media outlets as one of the nation’s best image consultants, providing overall services in closet reorganization, wardrobe consultations, style analysis, personal shopping and professional styling services

For more information, visit www.DiamondIconConsultants.com or www.LeahFrazier.com.