Join us for our next GFW PRSA luncheon on Wednesday, July 10, at Colonial Country Club!

The city of Fort Worth has always captured the imagination – and now more visitors are checking out our great city than ever before. Hear from Visit Fort Worth’s Executive Vice President for Marketing & Strategy, Mitch Whitten, on how the organization is sharing the welcome and helping boost our $2.6 billion visitor economy.

When: Wednesday, July 10, 2019, 11:30 A.M.  – 1:00 P.M.

Where: Colonial Country Club

Register here.

A Sorry State of Affairs: July PR History

Written by: Jeff Rodriguez, Historian

On July 20, 2010, the U.S. Department of Agriculture apologized to Shirley Sherrod. So did the NAACP, President Obama and, for good measure, news commentator Bill O’Reilly.

The source of all these mea culpas was the previous day’s events, when Sherrod had resigned her position as the Ag Department’s State Director of Rural Development for Georgia. And the source of her resignation was a video posted by the conservative journalist Andrew Breitbart. The clip showed Sherrod, who is black, giving a speech at a recent meeting of the NAACP. The clip showed – or rather, seemed to show — her admitting that she had once discriminated against a white farmer.

Within hours, Sherrod was more reviled than aerosol cheese. Both the NAACP and Secretary of Agriculture Tom Vilsack were critical. O’Reilly called for Sherrod’s immediate resignation, saying her comments were “simply unacceptable.” And behind the scenes, the Obama Administration was quietly getting ready to post her position on Zip Recruiter.

As Sherrod was driving home from work that night, her supervisor called, asking for her resignation; she pulled over and typed it out on her Blackberry. But her email included some serious foreshadowing, stating, “I will get the whole story out.”

And indeed she did, appearing on television the next day. Because it turned out that the video had been “slightly edited,” in the same way you might say that aerosol cheese has been “slightly processed.” When the full clip was seen, it became clear that Sherrod actually was speaking against racism. As another conservative journalist, Rich Lowry, later wrote, “Her full speech is heartfelt and moving … the tale of someone overcoming hatred and rancor when she had every reason not to.” Even the white farmer’s wife spoke on Sherrod’s behalf.

And so began the apologies from all – well, most — quarters. Secretary Vilsack also offered Sherrod a new position with the department, but she declined, perhaps knowing that the job would conflict with the speaking tour she would soon be booking.

Today, it’s easy to criticize everyone for their haste. But as PR pros, it’s worth considering the factors that might have been at play. As The Atlantic later noted, the Administration was “extremely sensitive to the charge that Obama is using his presidency to advance the cause of black people.” Thus, the effort to minimize some bad publicity may have created worse publicity.

After the dust settled, Sherrod continued to be involved with organizations that assist poor and minority farmers. And of course, she wrote that book. She also sued Breitbart; that case was settled confidentially in 2015.

Ultimately, Sherrod’s story is a helpful reminder for both PR pros and our clients: Although you can get a great workout by jumping to conclusions and pointing fingers, it’s usually healthier just to exercise some discretion.

Poll Position: June PR History

Written by: Jeff Rodriguez, Historian

This month’s column is dedicated to our Founding Fathers, who, from our earliest days of nationhood, had both the vision and the courage to grant women the right to vote.

Oh wait: This is supposed to be historical.

In that case, we should take a moment to remember June 4, 1919. On that day, the Senate narrowly approved the 19thAmendment, granting women suffrage. (The House had approved it earlier.) Women had taken a huge step toward equality — just 143 years after the Declaration of Independence.

Opposition to the amendment had been intense and could serve as a master class in persuasive – albeit misguided — PR tactics. Some people argued that giving women the right to vote would lead to the end of chivalry, while others maintained it would cause women to stop marrying and having children.

Then, too, women were considered too busy caring for their children and households to deal with such weighty issues. And they certainly lacked the sound reasoning skills of the great male leaders, wise men like Genghis Khan, Stalin and the U.S. Congress.

Indeed, when the Senate had taken up the bill, one member asserted that letting women vote would “place the Government under petticoat rule.” Another legislator stated that women’s suffrage would result in “disaster and ruin” for the country; this, he man-splained, was because men “could never resist the blandishments of women.”1

Often overlooked is how effective the suffragettes’ own PR efforts were —  and how much endured to achieve their goal. They previously had organized a march down Pennsylvania Avenue and protested outside the White House, both times being met with violence. As early as 1916, they had set up a publicity bureau in D.C. so they could lobby Congressmen in person. And hide their remote controls.

Notably, at least some of the media coverage was balanced. The day after the vote, the New York Times announced that, “Suffrage Wins In Senate, Now Goes To States,” with the article stating that women had prevailed “After a long and persistent fight.” There was no other media coverage that day, but only because the night before, all of the nations’ women had refused to do laundry, pack lunches and get the kids off to school, leaving their helpless husbands stuck at home.

The journey to ratification would be perilous and drag out over 14 months. But if that seems a little slow, it’s worth remembering how long women had waited just to get this far. After all, Wyoming had granted women the right to vote back in 1869. And they’re not even in the Big XII.

Today, the arguments against women’s suffrage seem both quaint and offensive. But it’s worth remembering how widespread those ideas once were, and how hard it was to overcome them. It’s also worth remembering that sometimes, a campaign to win over public sentiment is less about the facts and more about, well, the sentiment.

1 Blandishment (n.): A flattering or pleasing statement or action used to gently persuade someone to do something. Like put the toilet seat down.

 

Join us for our next GFW PRSA luncheon on Wednesday, June 12, at Colonial Country Club!

Employees are the center of our world in internal communications, but have you ever thought about treating them like a consumer? They are “buying” your company culture, priorities and mission. Join us on Wednesday, June 12 to hear from Crystal Forester, Senior Communications Manager, GM Financial, on how to leverage consumer marketing tactics to engage your employees.

When: Wednesday, June 12, 2019, 11:30 A.M.  – 1:00 P.M.

Where: Colonial Country Club

Register here. 

Join us for our next GFW PRSA luncheon on Wednesday, May 8, at Colonial Country Club!

Join us for the next GFW PRSA luncheon, Wednesday, May 8, featuring guest speaker, Kim Speairs, APR, MBA, PCCA Director of Communications and Engagement.
 
Culture can be a major competitive advantage in a tight economy and even tighter job market. A company’s culture drives people’s behavior, engagement, innovation, customer service and its overall profitability. And yet, many companies are not dedicating the time or resources to define and foster it. In this workshop, we’ll explore how and why you – as a public relations and communications professional – can develop and help drive team engagement throughout your organization. We’ll look at how and where to initiate the conversations, how to gather the insights you need and ways to put a plan into action.

When: Wednesday, May 8, 2019, 11:30 A.M.  – 1:00 P.M.

Where: Colonial Country Club

Register here.